The Beauty of Quinninup

The Beauty of Quinninup

Fritz Nabholz has taken some gorgeous snaps of Karri Lake and surrounds to share with you.  These are taken from Fritz and Lynnette's back door...  Come on down to Quinninup to see this beauty and breathe in the gorgeousness...

Feathered Friends in Quinninup

Feathered Friends in Quinninup

Feathered friends abound in Quinninup, and are a vital aspect of all that we work to protect in our region.  The feathered beauties featured here were captured in their glory in our back garden.

The above Red Wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata) put on quite a display for us one late afternoon, including an impressive sound performance.  We call them ‘chock chock’ birds because of their alarm call.

In the gallery you can also view

  • The Red Winged Fairy Wren (Malurus elegans) was enjoying exploring in one of our grevilleas.  They love our jarrah-karri forest regions and are still listed as moderately common, but have been reduced in numbers by habitat disturbance.  They also love a well vegetated garden, so let’s give them some habitat back...

  • The Spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus punctatus) nested in a burrow in a slope of our yard.  This Pardalote species is common, migratory and seasonally nomadic.  They can be elusive however, you may need to listen out for their gorgeous birdsong.

  • And then of course, there’s the Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae).  They are an introduced species, first recorded in SW WA in 1897.  Gerald Kealy has recorded first encountering a Laughing Kookaburra in Quinninup some time after his family settled here in 1908.  Our friend pictured landed on our verandah after a drenching in the rain.

Quinninup Stalwart Wins 2017 Senior Citizen of the Year

Quinninup Stalwart Wins 2017 Senior Citizen of the Year

Quinninup’s own Liz Bursey has been awarded Shire of Manjimup 2017 Senior Citizen of the Year. 

Liz (pictured 2nd from left) received the honour on account of her tireless work in our community.  Her endless grant application work is responsible for so many of our community improvements, her countless hours spent volunteering throughout our community help make Quinninup the wonderful place that it is. 

Congratulations Liz!

King Karri Area Burn-Off

King Karri Area Burn-Off

Fire season is upon us again, and as we all know, Quinninup is a high risk area.  The ‘King Karri’ area was finally subjected to a long awaited prescribed burn in January 2017.  Government authorities and our own Quinninup Fire Brigade carried out a successful burn operation over several days, reducing fuel loads and the subsequent risks of fire to our community.

 

The Felling of A Giant

The Felling of A Giant

The magnificent Hollow Butt Karri situated on the King Karri walk trail has fallen.  Estimated to be over 370 years old, this magnificent tree has long been a much admired icon of the area saved from logging and now preserved by national park status.

Years of lobbying and hard work by Quinninup community members in the late 1980s through the 1990s achieved the protection of this area.  A moratorium on logging was achieved in 1991, followed by an AHC interim listing in 1992.  Our iconic walk trails were developed starting in 1993, and the Quinninup Eco Module Information Shelter in 1994. Work continued, below is an excerpt from a 1999 QCA submission.

Preservation status of our ancient and modern forests, ecological diversity, and thus our natural and social histories was achieved.

The King Karri walk features giant, ancient Karri forestwith a variety of understory creepers including white clematis, purple hardenbergia, and red coral vine.  A winter walk will reveal many of the 18 families of macro-fungi growing around Quinninup, along with mosses, ferns, liverworts, and lichens.